Archives For March 2013

The secret of success

Brad Stanton —  March 31, 2013 — 2 Comments

Igazu falls - Brazil

Igazu falls – Brazil (Photo credit: @Doug88888)

The secret of success in life is for a man to be ready for his opportunity when it comes.—DISRAELI.

From the book Pushing to the Front by O S Marden

“There are no longer any good chances for young men,” complained a youthful law student to Daniel Webster. “There is always room at the top,” replied the great statesman and jurist.

No chance, no opportunities, in a land where thousands of poor boys become rich men, where newsboys go to Congress, and where those born in the lowest stations attain the highest positions? The world is all gates, all opportunities to him who will use them. But, like Bunyan’s Pilgrim in the dungeon of Giant Despair’s castle, who had the key of deliverance all the time with him but had forgotten it, we fail to rely wholly upon the ability to advance all that is good for us which has been given to the weakest as well as the strongest. We depend too much upon outside assistance.

“We look too high
For things close by.”

A Baltimore lady lost a valuable diamond bracelet at a ball, and supposed that it was stolen from the pocket of her cloak. Years afterward she washed the steps of the Peabody Institute, pondering how to get money to buy food. She cut up an old, worn-out, ragged cloak to make a hood, when lo! in the lining of the cloak she discovered the diamond bracelet. During all her poverty she was worth $3500, but did not know it.

Many of us who think we are poor are rich in opportunities, if we could only see them, in possibilities all about us, in faculties worth more than diamond bracelets. In our large Eastern cities it has been found that at least ninety-four out of every hundred found their first fortune at home, or near at hand, and in meeting common every-day wants. It is a sorry day for a young man who can not see any opportunities where he is, but thinks he can do better somewhere else.

Some Brazilian shepherds organized a party to go to California to dig gold, and took along a handful of translucent pebbles to play checkers with on the voyage. After arriving in San Francisco, and after they had thrown most of the pebbles away, they discovered that they were diamonds. They hastened back to Brazil, only to find that the mines from which the pebbles had been gathered had been taken up by other prospectors and sold to the government.

Orison Swett Marden. Pushing to the Front (Kindle Locations 891-908).

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“Deep within man dwell these slumbering powers; powers that would astonish him…,forces that would revolutionize his life if aroused and put into action.”~Orison Swett Marden 

“My daddy is very important” said a pretty little girl at a children’s party in Denmark; “he is in a very high office for the king. Some people’s last name ends in the letters “sen” and they will never amount to anything. We have to work hard to keep those kind of people down, because they are not related to aristocracy.

“But my papa can buy a hundred dollars’ worth of bonbons, and give them away to children,” angrily exclaimed the daughter of the rich merchant Petersen. “Can your papa do that?”

“Yes,” chimed in the daughter of an editor, “my papa can write about your papa and everybody’s papa in the newspaper. All sorts of people are afraid of him, my papa says, for he can do as he likes with the paper.”

“Oh, if I could be one of them!” thought a little boy peeping through the crack of the door, by permission of the cook for whom he had been turning the spit. But no, his parents had not even a penny to spare, and his name ended in “sen.”

Years afterwards when the children of the party had become men and women, some of them went to see a splendid house, filled with all kinds of beautiful and valuable objects. There they met the owner, once the very boy who thought it so great a privilege to peep at them through a crack in the door as they played. He had become the great sculptor Thorwaldsen.

This sketch is adapted from a story by a poor Danish cobbler’s son, another whose name did not keep him from becoming famous,—Hans Christian Andersen. With quotes from Orison Swett Marden


Bamboo

Bamboo (Photo credit: Brian Wilkins)

There is a type of bamboo that develops very slowly after it is planted. The roots begin to spread out. The bamboo doesn’t begin to grow up until the roots are fully established.  It takes four years for the roots to develop enough to support a tall bamboo plant. Then suddenly in the fifth year, the bamboo begins to grow very quickly and can grow 80 feet in one year. It can grow almost 4 inches in one day!

Many people work very hard on their dreams and goals in life. They may work hard year after year on a marriage, a relationship, a career, a business or other endeavor. They may feel that they are making no progress. But suddenly, success can come.

Jerry and Jana Lackey worked year after year in Botswana, Africa. They built orphanages and helped poor people. But they were limited by the need for money to build bigger facilities. One day they met a rich German businessman who gave them five million dollars for a huge facility to help people there in Botswana. Their year of growth appeared suddenly.

If you are working hard and don’t see any results, don’t get discouraged. God is lining up all the right people for you. Suddenly a rich businessperson can appear on the scene and help you. Suddenly a spouse or child can change. Suddenly your business can win the big client. Keep the faith and good things really will happen.

 

Get more views

Brad Stanton —  March 23, 2013 — 7 Comments

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Use a powerful headline.

A powerful headline will grab people’s attention and arouse enough interest to cause them to read the article.

Make a strong first paragraph

When I scan through blogs I check the headline and a few sentences of the first paragraph. If it looks interesting I click on it to read more. If it doesn’t hook me in I go on to the next post.

Images hook people in

A good photo, art, or diagram can also cause a person to read your post. I often sort wordpress blogs by the tag word “photography” and scan through them, stopping at interesting images.

Make it easy to read

Avoid words that are not simple English. Remember, many people reading your blogs are not native English speakers and won’t understand obscure words. People often like to scan blog posts, so short sentences and headers (in darker print) are good. Professional bloggers say keep posts short, less than 600 words. Normally a blog post is shorter than a magazine article.

More about how to get more blog views in the link below (it is one of my most popular posts):

https://bradstanton.com/2013/01/14/9-steps-to-get-more-blog-views/


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John Grisham, the famous writer, was turned down by 16 agents and a dozen publishers before he got his first book published. It is amazing that he was only turned down that many times because many great writers were turned down ten times more than that.

John was a lawyer working 60-80 hours a week in Southaven Mississippi. But he still found time to write. He would get up at 5 AM every morning to write for an hour. After three years he finished his first novel – A Time to Kill.

Actor Harrison Ford was told by the VP of Columbia that he just didn’t have what it takes to become an actor. Ford became a self-taught carpenter and made cabinets and other things for the rock band The Doors, Sally Kellerman and a recording studio for Sergio Mendes. He made cabinets in the home of Georg Lucas, who gave him a role in American Graffiti (1973). Lucas didn’t give Ford the part of Han Solo right away. It took a lot of work and persuasion by Ford, but that role made him extremely famous.

Steven Spielberg tried to go to filmmaking school but was not accepted. He visited Universal Studios and met Chuck Silvers, an executive there. Silvers invited him to come back. Spielberg did and hung around the whole summer, pretending to be an employee there, wearing a black suit and carrying his father’s briefcase with nothing inside it but his lunch.

10 years later Spielberg directed Jaws, which made more money than any other movie at that time.